Most Common Backyard Birds

If feeding wild birds is a new interest to you, you are probably wondering what birds will visit your backyard. Find out here what is most commonly seen.
By now, you may even have your first bird feeder placed and filled with seed. I am sure that as a beginning bird feeder, you are excited to see wild birds showing up in your backyard! The activities surrounding bird feeding are a journey of knowledge into the life of birds. In the course of your journey, you will be enlightened by their antics as well as their presence.
However, before you do tap into the life of backyard birds, it would be helpful to become acquainted with them. Becoming acquainted with a person, you would likely want to know their name, right? That introduction would draw you closer the person.
Identifying and being introduced to these common backyard birds is like coming to know a person’s name; in this instance, your new friend is a feathered friend.
Knowing what each bird is helps you identify them, as you would any person.
With this thought underway, let’s get you acquainted with the most common backyard birds!
Two Ways to make feathered friends
Because the eastern and western United States and Canada encompass such a large area of bird habitat, and the many birds listed below have their own environment, I have simplified the list in order to give you a general idea of what birds you are most likely to see and attract.
In addition, you can get further acquainted with your future feathered friends with a more specific look at the backyard birds of your locale found at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology All About Birds site
.
By now you are thinking “What are the most common birds of my region?”
So, allow me to introduce you…
Birds of the East: Spring – Fall

  • Northern Cardinal
  • Mourning Dove
  • American Goldfinch
  • Black0capped Chickadee
  • Boat-tailed Grackle
  • House (English) Sparrow
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • Carolina Chickadee
  • European Starling
  • Common Grackle
  • American Robin
  • Eastern Bluebirds
  • Red-winged Blackbirds
  • Barn Swallows

*not in my locale
Birds of the East: Winter

  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • House Finch
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Blue Jay
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Mourning Dove
  • American Goldfinch
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Eastern Bluebird
  • Chipping Sparrow
  • Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • Eastern Towhee*
  • Pine Siskin
  • Yellow-rumped Warbler*
  • Purple Finch*
  • Spotted Towhee*
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • American Robin**

*not in my locale
**have appeared in winter, although not commonly – some groups remain north while others migrate south
Birds of the West: Spring – Fall

  • Stellar‘s Jay
  • Black Phoebe
  • Western Scrub-Jay
  • Mountain Chickadee
  • Black-chinned Hummingbird
  • Berwick‘s Wren
  • Yellow-rumped Warbler
  • Western Kingbird
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Ruby-crowned Kinglet
  • Western Tanager
  • Chipping Sparrow
  • Carolina Chickadee

Birds of the West: Winter

  • Northern Flicker
  • White-winged Dove
  • House Finch
  • Pine Siskin
  • Stellar‘s Jay
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Lesser Goldfinch
  • Ruby-crowned Kinglet
  • Mourning Dove
  • Song Sparrow
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • European Starling
  • House (English) Sparrow
  • Scrub Jay
  • Mountain Chickadee
  • American Goldfinch
  • Chestnut-backed Chickadee
  • White-crowned Sparrow
  • American Crow
  • Easter Towhee
  • Curve-billed Thrasher
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • Spotted Towhee
  • Anna’s Hummingbird
  • Canyon Towhee

I have introduced you to many different birds of North America. With a general idea of what birds are most likely to come to your backyard, you have some feathered friends to make!
Now visit the Cornell Lab of Ornithology All About Birds site
to pinpoint the backyard birds that inhabit your locale… Cornell features the identity of each backyard bird of your locale. You could use this as a free tool for bird identification.
Once you know what to expect in your backyard, have your binoculars ready, and set foot in your journey of feeding the most common wild birds of your backyard!

– Craig Curtis